Linking black and minority ethnic organisations with mainstream homeless service providers

Author(s): Gina Netto;   Theo Gavrielides;  

Briefing series: Better Housing Briefing Paper 15

Publisher: Race Equality Foundation

Publication date: May 2010

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Linking black and minority ethnic organisations with mainstream homeless service providers
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This paper argues that homelessness service provision to black and minority ethnic communities should be informed by in-depth knowledge and understanding of the causes, manifestations and perceptions of homelessness, and should address the significant barriers these communities face when accessing homelessness services. The paper also highlights significant differences between black and minority ethnic and mainstream organisations, and possible improvements that could be gained by forging stronger links between them, including increased awareness of homelessness services, access to early intervention and ongoing support to vulnerable individuals.

  • Key messages:
  • Homelessness service provision to black and minority ethnic communities needs to be informed by in-depth knowledge and understanding of the causes, manifestations and perceptions of homelessness within these communities
  • Black and minority ethnic and mainstream homelessness organisations should address the significant barriers faced by black and minority ethnic communities in accessing homelessness services
  • Significant differences exist in the nature of services offered by black and minority ethnic and mainstream organisations
  • The provision of homelessness services to black and minority ethnic homeless individuals can be improved by forging stronger links between black and minority ethnic and mainstream homelessness organisations
  • Partnership working between black and minority ethnic and mainstream organisations can seek to increase awareness of homelessness services among these communities, widen access to early intervention, maintain ongoing support to vulnerable individuals and inform policy development.

Sections:

  • Addressing homelessness in the UK
  • Difficulties in accessing services
  • Nature and patterns of service provision
  • Need for links between agencies
  • Practice points for future joint working