Ethnicity, health and the private rented sector

Author(s): Megan McFarlane;  

Corporate author: BSHF

Briefing series: Better Housing Briefing Paper 25

Publisher: Race Equality Foundation

Publication date: November 2014

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Ethnicity, health and the private rented sector
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The link between poor housing and poor health is well documented and extremely complex, with numerous confounding factors having direct and indirect impacts on both physical and mental health. Evidence shows that homes in the private rented sector in England are in poorer physical condition compared to owner-occupied or social rented sector homes, whilst the recession has led to rising levels of insecurity within the sector, which may also have an impact on the health of residents. While the likelihood of living in the private rented sector has grown for all demographic groups, black and minority ethnic households, younger people and recent migrants are over-represented both in the private rented sector and in homes which are in poor physical conditions. This paper looks at the relationship between poor housing and health for black and minority ethnic communities and also considers recent policy responses and practical developments.

Key messages:

  • There has been a marked increase in the actual and relative number of households living in the private rented sector
  • Poor housing conditions are more prevalent in the private rented sector compared to both the owner occupied and social rented sectors
  • Overall black and minority ethnic households and recent migrants are more likely to be living in the private rented sector and are more likely to be living in poor housing conditions
  • Poor housing contributes to a range of health and wellbeing impacts
  • There has been a range of responses to address the issue of poor standards in the private rented sector

Sections:

  • There has been a marked increase in the actual and relative number of households living in the private rented sector
  • Poor housing conditions are more prevalent in the private rented sector compared to both the owner occupied and social rented sectors
  • Overall black and minority ethnic households and recent migrants are more likely to be living in the private rented sector and are more likely to be living in poor housing conditions
  • Poor housing contributes to a range of health and wellbeing impacts
  • There has been a range of responses to address the issue of poor standards in the private rented sector